Lady Triệu – 225 – 248 – Vietnam

Vietnam

Lady Trieu

Almost two centuries after the rise and fall of the warrior sisters Trưng Trắc and Trưng Nhị, Vietman was still under Chinese rule. The native people continued to resist foreign domination, and uprisings were a regular occurrence.

It was time for another heroine.

Lady Triệu (also known as Triệu Thị Trinh) was a young woman who refused to go down without a fight. She ran away from her village into the forest, where she gathered an army to take on the Chinese.

Her brother tried to stop her and convince her to settle down, but she shook him off, assuring him that she was meant for better things:

“I’d like to ride storms, kill sharks in the open sea, drive out the aggressors, reconquer the country, undo the ties of serfdom, and never bend my back to be the concubine of whatever man.”

《欽定越史通鑑綱目》卷首This was a difficult argument to ignore, and her brother chose to join her.

Lady Triệu is described by Vietnamese sources as literally larger than life at 9 feet tall, with a voice like a ‘temple bell’. Like all good heroes she had stamina, and could walk 500 leagues in one day.

Historians describe Lady Triệu as riding war-elephants into battle and wearing yellow tunics, gaining the title ‘Nhụy Kiều Tướng quân’ – the Lady General clad in Golden Robes. Her gaze was supposedly so fierce that the Chinese soldiers were afraid to meet her eyes.

Sadly, like her predecessors the Tru’ng sisters, Lady Triệu’s rebellion did not last. Unable to gain enough support to grow her army, Lady Triệu was eventually defeated in 248. According to legend she was so brokenhearted at the loss that she killed herself.

However, a small thing like being dead would not stop her from being a nuisance to the Chinese, and legend says that her spirit haunted the Chinese general who had beaten her. Her memory continued to offer hope and support to the subjugated Vietnamese for centuries and today she is a celebrated national hero.

Den-tho-ba-trieu

Bà Triệu Temple

 


 

References:

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Women in World History: 4 Volume Set  Bonnie G. Smith

The Birth of Vietnam Keith Weller Taylor

On Wikipedia:


 

Image credits:

By 阮朝國史館(Quốc sử quán triều Nguyễn) – National Library of Vietnam, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=6446560

View from outside of the gate of Bà Triệu Temple in Hậu Lộc District, Thanh Hóa Province By Mai Trung Dung – Own work, Public Domain

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The Trưng Sisters – c. 12 – 43 – Jiaozhi, Vietnam

Vietnam

When the enemy is at the gate, the woman goes out fighting

(Old Vietnamese adage)

TrungSisters

Though they are sadly not as well-known as western warrior women like Boudica, the story of Vietnamese sisters Trưng Trắc (徵側) and Trưng Nhị (徵貳) and their rebellion against Imperial China is just thrilling and vivid.

Born in Jiaozhi, Northern Vietnam, the Trưng sisters were raised in a noble military household, where they learned martial arts from their father, a prefect of Mê Linh. They grew into intelligent and accomplished young women, and when a neighbouring prefect came to visit their father, his son, Thi Sách, could not help but fall in love with the elder sister, Trưng Trắc.

The pair were very happily married. However, this was no fairytale ending, as the two families were living under the Chinese Han dynasty, who had invaded and conquered Northern Vietnam some decades earlier.

The native Vietnamese were extremely unhappy by what they viewed as their oppression under Chinese rule, and there are many accounts of the Hans forcing the Vietnamese to assimilate to Chinese culture as they pushed further southwards.

The newly married Thi Sách chose to rebel, and was executed for his insurrection. Motivated by this cruel injustice, the Trưng sisters sprang into action, assembling an army of both men and women to drive out the Chinese.

The rebellion was immensely successful, taking back as many as 65 citadels and liberating Nanyue within months. Trưng Trắc and Trưng Nhị were appointed queens of Nanyue and held off the Han for over three years from 40 – 43 CE.

A memorial parade for the sisters in Ho Chi Min City

A memorial parade for the sisters in Ho Chi Min City

Unfortunately, nothing could keep the Han dynasty back forever, and the reign of the sisters was short lived. Both Trưng Trắc and Trưng Nhị were defeated in battle in 43 – some sources say they were executed, others say they committed suicide once they saw the battle was lost.

Whatever happened, the legacy of the Trưng Sisters remains revered in Vietnam. It was the first resistance movement against the Chinese after over 200 years of subjugation. There is a district in Hanoi named after the women, as well as many streets in large cities and several schools. In addition there are a number of temples dedicated to the Trưng Sisters and a yearly holiday is observed in February commemorating their deaths.

“All the male heroes bowed their heads in submission, Only the two sisters proudly stood up to avenge the country”

– 15th Century Vietnamese poem


References:

Postcolonial Vietnam: New Histories of the National Past Patricia M. Pelley

The Birth of Vietnam – Keith Weller Taylor

On Wikipedia:


Image credits:

On a sunny day in Saigon, national heroines of Viet Nam are honored with a parade of elephants and floats” by SAS Scandinavian Airlines – http://images.flysas.com.

Licensed under Public Domain via Wikimedia Commons